Late Summer Pests

Cockroaches on wall | The Bug Man

Summer is a time of abundance; an abundance of sunshine, fresh fruit, memories, and unfortunately pests. While many people hope the end of summer also signals the end of pest season, some find that it is quite the opposite. During the late summer, many pests become a greater nuisance. Whether it is due to the warm weather, an increase in food, or for winter preparation, there’s no doubt late summer is a time for increased pest activity.

Late Summer Pests Found in Knoxville, Tennessee

While all pests are a nuisance, these late summer pests are particularly bothersome to many homeowners. Their increased activity during this time can turn outdoor gatherings into itchy affairs, and their intrusion into homes can create unwelcome disturbances.

Cockroaches

Cockroaches thrive in the warm and humid weather during the summer, but as summer slowly fades into fall, these heat-loving bugs will start invading homes in search of food and shelter from the cold. Late summer is the perfect time for these scavengers to find some of their favorite treats around your home: fallen fruit, decaying vegetation, and your barbeque leftovers.

Mosquitoes

Mosquitoes are summer’s most frustrating pests. Many people hope to find reprieve from these biting pests as summer wanes, but many find mosquitoes to be even more active in the late summer. The warm weather encourages growth and breeding as well as increasing food availability for mosquito larvae, leading to a sharp increase in the mosquito population.

Rodents

During late summer, rodents such as house mice and Norway rats become more active as they seek shelter and food in preparation for the upcoming cooler months. With outdoor resources dwindling, these adaptable creatures are driven to enter homes and businesses, searching kitchens for whatever food they can steal.

Bed Bugs

Late summer is a time when many people end up with bed bug infestation. Although these pests are a year-round problem, there is a marked increase in infestations during the summer due to travel. Bedbugs can be found in vacation rentals, hotel beds, and on public transportation. These skilled hitchhikers latch onto luggage, clothing, and other personal items, making it easy for them to come home with you after your summer vacation.

The Bug Man – Tenessee’s Leading Pest Control Company

Ready to take control of late summer pests? Look no further than The Bug Man for comprehensive pest management solutions. Our expert team has over 20 years of experience tackling the surge of mosquitoes, bed bugs, cockroaches, and rodents that often become more active during this season. Don’t let these pests take over your home and outdoor spaces. Whether it’s preventative measures or eliminating an existing infestation, our professionals have you covered.

Are pests ruining your summer? Don’t let these summer pests turn into fall frustrations! Contact the Bug Man today and keep your home pest-free every season of the year.

 

What Should You Do If Your Dog Gets Bit by a Tick

woman checking dogs for ticks in TN | The Bug Man

Spring and summer is tick season. It’s crucial to be vigilant about ticks on your dogs since these tiny parasites can transmit diseases to humans and dogs alike. Some of the most common tick-borne illnesses include:

The symptoms of these diseases can vary, but typical signs by your dog include fever, joint pain, lameness, loss of appetite, and fatigue. To protect your dog from tick bites, learn about prevention methods, safe tick removal, and when to seek professional help.

How to Prevent Tick Bites on Dogs

The best defense against tick bites is to keep them from biting your dog in the first place. Here are some tips to keep your dog tick-free:

  • Avoid areas where ticks are likely to be found, such as tall grass, brush, woods, and leaf piles.
  • Use tick repellent or preventive products on your dog, such as collars, spot-on treatments, or oral medications. Consult your veterinarian for advice on the best options for your pet.
  • Check your dog for ticks daily, especially after spending time outdoors. Pay close attention to areas where ticks like to hide, such as the ears, neck, armpits, groin, and between the toes.
  • Maintain a clean and tidy yard by regularly mowing the lawn, trimming bushes, raking leaves, and removing any debris that could attract ticks.

How to Remove Ticks From Your Dog

If you find a tick on your dog, do not panic. You can remove it safely and easily by following these steps:

  1. Wear gloves or use a tissue to protect your hands from the tick’s saliva.
  2. Use a tick removal tool or fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible. Avoid squeezing or twisting the tick’s body.
  3. Gently and steadily pull the tick straight out with consistent pressure. Do not jerk or yank it.
  4. Place the tick in a sealed container or a Ziplock bag with some rubbing alcohol. It may be useful for identification or testing if your dog shows signs of illness.
  5. Clean the bite area and your hands with soap and water or rubbing alcohol.
  6. Keep a close eye on your dog for any symptoms of tick-borne diseases for several weeks. If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian immediately.

Professional Tick Extermination

Despite taking preventive measures, you may still face a tick infestation in your home or yard. Ticks can hitchhike on other animals or people and infest your property. They can also hide in cracks and crevices, surviving for extended periods without feeding.

This is where professional extermination from The Bug Man becomes crucial. With over 20 years of experience, we are the trusted and experienced pest control company serving Central Tennessee. Schedule your appointment with The Bug Man today to tackle your tick problem head-on.

Keeping Wasps Out of Your Car: Tips for a Sting-Free Drive

Wasp on a car window in central Tennessee

Wasps are known for their painful stings and send many people running at the sight of these flying pests; the last place you want to encounter a wasp is inside your moving car! A wasp or other stinging insect in your car can pose a risk to your safety and the safety of others on the road. Fortunately, there are several steps you can take to prevent wasps and other stinging insects from building nests inside your vehicle.

Why Do Wasps Nest in Empty Cars?

An empty car is attractive to wasps for a few reasons. Sitting cars provide a sheltered and protected environment that offers warmth to these cold-blooded insects, especially in colder climates. They will build nests in hollow areas, such as the engine bay or interior, where they can benefit from the residual heat. 

Wasps often build their nests in sheltered, quieter areas. An unattended car that has been sitting for a while offers a hidden, undisturbed place for wasps to build their nests without interference.

In addition to shelter, a sitting car can provide food for a colony of wasps. Those crumbs and leftover snacks that have been hiding underneath your seats are the perfect all-you-can-eat buffet for wasps. 

Why Are There Wasps in My Car?

Several factors can attract wasps to your car, making it more likely for them to take up residence. Understanding these attractions can help you implement preventive measures:

  • Leftover Food and Sweets: Wasps are always on the hunt for food, particularly sweet and sugary substances. Any leftover food, sweet or spilled drinks inside your car can lure them in. 
  • Location: If your car is parked near flowers, garbage cans or other things that attract wasps it greatly increases the chances they will find their way into your car.
  • Air Fresheners: A pleasant smelling car is important for many people but little do they know it may be attracting stinging insects. A wasp cannot tell the difference between their favorite snack and your sweet smelling air freshener.
  • Gaps and Holes: Wasps can easily find their way into your car through small openings or gaps, such as open windows or damaged door seals. Ensure that all windows are tightly closed and any gaps are properly sealed to prevent them from entering.

Removing Wasps From Your Car

When it comes to removing wasp nests from your car, it is important to seek the help of a professional wasp extermination company like The Bug Man. Removing active wasps nests on your own can leave you with painful stings and may not completely remove the active nest.

The Bug Man’s technicians have 20 years of experience and knowledge to safely eliminate the nest without endangering yourself or others. We develop effective and environmentally friendly pest management plans centered around ongoing prevention, removal, monitoring, and exclusion.

Don’t become a wasp taxi! Contact The Bug Man today and we’ll get your back on the road so you can drive safely without any unwanted backseat drivers!

When is termite season

When is termite season in central TN

When are termites active?  When is termite season?

Termites are reason for concern, and two of the most commonly asked questions we receive at The Bug Man office are: “When are termites active?” and “When is termite season?”.  In Tennessee, termites are actually active year-round.  We have found active termites in crawl spaces in the winter time when there has been snow on the ground.  Yeah, pretty funny… snow on the ground in middle Tennessee? Ha! That hardly ever happens.  The termites may not be as active, or active outside in the mulch when the ground turns cold but, with our heated homes, the crawl spaces stay warm enough to sustain termite activity year round.

Most people become aware of termite activity during termite swarm season.  In middle Tennessee, this generally occurs in the spring time, between March and May.  This is the time of year when you see the alate termites (the winged termites) emerging from the walls, floors, and ceilings of homes.  Swarm season is The Bug Man’s busiest time for termite work because most homeowners are calling in with sightings of the termite swarmers.  Most swarming termites will die after swarming, as they become a food source for birds, lizards, and other insects and spiders.  And the termites that swarm indoors all die if they are unable to return to the soil in short order after locating a suitable mate.

Termite swarmers are not the termites that homeowners need to fear, but they are a great indicator that you have an infestation.  The termite colony consists of termite workers that consume the cellulose in wood and feed the rest of the colony.  These are the termites that cause the damage to structures.  Our treatments are designed to target and eliminate the colony of termites and protect the structure from future attacks.  The Bug Man treatment of choice is Termidor HE.  Termidor has been proven to last for over 15 years in studies, and we are able to offer a 20 year renewable warranty with our treatments.

When should I have my home inspected?

The Bug Man recommends having a termite inspection every 12-18 months.  Termite inspections can be completed year round in Tennessee.  During this inspection our certified technicians will inspect all accessible areas for evidence of termites.  We inspect for termite shelter tubes, tunnels, exit holes, wood debris in crawl spaces, and other conducive conditions that can lead to a future termite infestation.  Even with a complete inspection, it is still possible that a structure can have a termite infestation that goes undetected.  Termites can gain entry behind brick, through block, travel behind walls and under floors.  Many of these spaces are not accessible during a visual inspection.  Many times, even the professional must wait until there are visible signs of damage before we are able to locate an active termite infestation.  This is the reason that we recommend treatments on homes even when there is not a current visible sign of termites.  Termite treatment is one of the maintenance requirements of home ownership.  Once a home is under a termite protection treatment and warranty, we continue to perform yearly inspections to ensure the home remains termite free.

The Bug Man offers a free termite inspection and quote for Termidor HE Termite Protection.  Our certified technicians will provide a detailed written report of findings and quote for Termidor HE Termite Protection Protection.  Our goal at The Bug Man is to educate and provide the findings of our inspection so you have all the tools necessary to make a decision on how best to protect your home.

Fire Ants found in middle Tennessee

Fire ants in Central TN

Are there fire ants in middle Tennessee and Murfreesboro?

I am asked frequently if fire ants are found in middle Tennessee.  The short answer to that question is Yes!  The first documented case of imported fire ants in Tennessee was back in 1987 in Hardin County.  Since then, the fire ants have been spreading across the state at a rapid pace.  Each year since 2001 when we started The Bug Man, we have seen increased activity and had increased customer calls requesting fire ant control.

Fire ants have been found in the Murfreesboro, Smyrna, and Christiana this past week and they are active!  We have sited them at local parks and sports complexes, in the median strips in parking lots, and even while out camping this past weekend in Oliver Spings, Tn.  The imported fire ants are taking over at a rapid pace.

Fire ants are easy to locate, look for the mounds

Imported fire ant nests are easy to locate once they are built.  The ants build large mounds in the soil that can be over a foot tall and two feet wide.  The nests can extend into the ground up to 3 feet and spread out a few feet past the width of the visible nest.  Please, Do NOT disturb these nests.  A typical nest can have between 80,000 and 250,000 stinging ants in the colony!  Keep children and pets away, as the fire ants are dangerous when defending their nest.  When a fire ant nest is disturbed, all of the ants surface and begin to attack and sting any intruder.  They will climb up a stick or other device that was used to disturb the nest and sting the one holding it.  They will also swarm your feet and climb your legs, and sting!  The resulting stings will cause puss-filled blisters and will last few days to weeks.  This is not fun.  Growing up in Florida, I know personally what it feels like to be stung repetitively by fire ants.

If you find imported fire ant mounds when out around town, please leave them be.  If you locate them on you property, it is best to have them eliminated for the safety of your children and pets.  This can be done professionally by The Bug Man or you can visit a local store and purchase products to do-it-yourself.  If you choose the do-it-yourself option, please be sure to read and follow all label directions and be sure to wear your personal protective equipment.  Be safe!  I am including a link here to the University of Georgia that discusses in more detail the fire ants and the how to control them.

The video below shows what a typical fire ant nest looks like and how active they become once the nest is disturbed.  We do not recommend disturbing a fire ant nest.

Ticks in Tennessee will be active this year

tick in TN

Ticks in Tennessee during the summer can be very frustrating. Actually, as I wrote this blog there were several words describing ticks that floated to the surface: creepy, gross, worrisome, concerning… just to name a few. Mostly, people are very fearful. Not really about the tick, itself, but more about the diseases caused by the bite of a tick.

The best cure for tickborne diseases such as Lyme Disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is to avoid getting bitten by ticks.

This is another one of those situations where pest-related problems concern our health. Since we are in the business of pest control and are not health professionals, we generally prefer not to comment on the medical conditions caused by the pest. We do recommend  information on the CDC site titled Symptoms of Tickborne Illness. If you have health symptoms that you suspect may be caused by a tick or other pest then we suggest that you contact your physician. What we can do is educate you on tick control in order to reduce the chance that you may be bitten by a tick.

Ticks are arachnids, not insects, and classified as an external parasite.

A lot of people are surprised to learn that ticks are actually in the same family (arachnid) as spiders, mites, and scorpions. They have 8 jointed legs and no antennae. They require  a blood meal from a host in order to survive. A tick will attach firmly while they slowly feed on the blood of their host. They will feed, unnoticed, for several days before they release their grasp. They will feed on mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians.

There have been many species of ticks found in Tennessee. The three most common species are the American dog tick, lone star tick, and brown dog tick. All of these common ticks have four life stages- egg, larva, nymph, and adult. According to Dr. Karen Vail in her article titled Common Ticks of Tennessee and Their Control, each of the stages, other than the egg, requires a separate animal host to complete its development, which all together may be two or three years long. Each blood-engorged female leaves her host animal and lays a single mass of 3,000 to 6,000 eggs.

Ticks in Tennessee are most active from April through September. Though, it is not uncommon to see some tick activity through the winter months. During periods of high activity we recommend that you remain extra vigilant. Avoid areas known to be infested with ticks such as wooded and bushy areas with high grass and leaf litter. If you have to walk though these types of areas we recommend that you apply a repellent according label directions. Also, walk in the center of trails to avoid brushing up against vegetation.

Wear long sleeve shirts and pants. Tuck your pants into your socks to prevent ticks from climbing up the inside of the pant legs. Also, wear light-colored clothing so that you can detect ticks more easily. Upon returning from tick infested areas make sure to thoroughly check your body for ticks. You will want to quickly remove all ticks that are found.

Modify your environment to make it less desirable to ticks

Maybe you’re not going on a hike in the woods but you want to reduce or prevent a tick infestation around your home. There are several non-chemical things that you can do:

Make your surroundings less inviting to rodents and wildlife. They are often carriers of ticks. Reduce the rodents and you will reduce the ticks. It’s a win-win situation.

  • Repair areas where rodents can enter the home.
  • Remove wood piles and debris that make a good nesting area for rodents.
  • Keep pet food stored in sealed containers
  • Keep the lawn mowed and weeds to a minimum

Pets and tick prevention in TNDon’t forget about your four-legged babies, too. Please discuss tick treatment for your pets with a veterinarian.  There are many treatment methods available and something that works well for one pet may not be best for the other. Cats and some breeds of dogs can be sensitive to some products. So, it is always best to check with your vet, first. Also, you will want to inspect your pets and their bedding frequently for ticks.

The final measure for tick management is to hire a professional such as The Bug Man in Murfreesboro to treat the exterior of your home. Our technicians are very knowledgeable about areas that make a great tick habitat and areas that don’t. Most people are surprised to learn that ticks will avoid direct sunlight. So, treating the entire lawn is rarely necessary. We have noticed that customers on our mosquito program usually do not have a problem with ticks. This is probably due to the fact that mosquitoes and ticks have similar habitats such as the trees, shrubs, and shaded areas.

Indian Meal Moths: Silently Lurking in the Kitchen

meal moths in central TN

Nothing makes me shudder more than the thought of indian meal moths in my food pantry. We all have our bug fears & rants. Mine happens to be this evil little time gobbler of an insect that invades our food. This particular blog is personal for me, today. If you have not heard or experienced indian meal moths before then you will want to definitely read on.

Where are all of these moths coming from???

This will be the first thing that you say. Indian meal moths seem to come from nowhere. In the beginning it’s one here or there. After a couple of days it’s three or four. The next thing you know… they’re everywhere!

They struck our family last summer when we were in the middle of a family emergency. We had to travel to and from Tennessee for weeks on end. It’s almost like they sensed that we had no time to find the exact source of the problem. If you can find the source of the problem quickly then you will avoid the pantry crisis. We did not have the time to look at every item in the pantry like we KNEW we should do. We opened a few items like cereal, corn starch, flour, dog food, and nuts. We found several infested foot items and considered the matter finished.

How long do indian meal moths live?

The larvae of indian meal moths can take anywhere from 2 to 14 days to hatch. An adult will live anywhere from 5 to 25 days. Of course, this is all depending on the environmental conditions. In my book, 5 minutes is too long.

The indian meal moths continued to flutter about my kitchen for days on end. The problem was becoming worse by the day. Until finally, I said enough is enough. I’m tearing apart the pantry!!   Well, I found the nasty culprit. It was a lovely tin of popcorn from Christmas (thanks Mom!) that had gotten pushed to the corner over time and forgotten about. When I opened up that tin it was like something from that scene in the movie The Green Mile where John Coffey “takes back” the bugs. There were literally hundreds of them and they swarmed out of that tin in a black cloud all around my head. To say that I invented a new dance in the kitchen of my Murfreesboro, TN home that day would be an understatement.

Actually, finding the source was great news! I knew that I could finally get down to solving the problem. I removed every food item AND sealed container and inspected it. Every corner and crevice. Any containers with larvae, pupae, or moth was discarded in a trash bag. Everything else was wiped down thoroughly with a soapy sponge. Every time I saw a moth I would quickly suck it up in the vacuum.

There were all stages of indian meal moths everywhere I looked: In the food, crevices of bags, crevices of boxes, the screw-on lids of herbs, cracks of wall shelving, corners of pantry, inside lip of the chip clips.   Everywhere! I even found larvae & pupae in “sealed” storage containers holding herbs and seasonings that I had blended together myself. Some things are just not as sealed as you think they are. I was very disappointed to have to throw away those blends. Herbs and seasonings can be so expensive!

The process was very time consuming, but in the end the problem was resolved. Did I mention that no pesticides were used? The solution for indian meal moths can never be accomplished with pesticides. Sometimes, the job of a professional is not in what they do but in what they know. In the work of an exterminator this is called Integrated Pest Management or IPM. Basically, it is a combination of common sense and scientific principles we use to solve a pest problem whereby we reduce the risk to the environment and people. In the case of indian meal moths, we cannot treat the food or their containers so we rely on IPM to remedy the problem.

Chikungunya Fever and Mosquito Reduction

Chikungunya Fever and Mosquito Reduction

Chicken who?? Chikungunya.

The Chikungunya virus has been limited to Africa and Asia for a very long time. In fact, it was first recorded in a human in Tanzania in 1953. So, this is not a new virus. But, it’s quickly becoming a hot topic in the media since it was discovered in the caribbean in December 2013. The concern is that this could soon spread to the United States in the coming year from travelers.

According to the Centers For Disease Control (CDC), the Chikunguyna virus can cause high fever, severe pain, nausea, vomiting, and headache. The disease is spread by being bitten by a mosquito that has previously bitten an infected person. It is not transmitted person to person.

The Bug Man is in the business of controlling pests and we are not medical professionals. But, because pests can spread disease and cause a variety of illnesses we are often caught in the middle of addressing the medical concerns caused by the pests. If you have any of the symptoms listed above we will always tell you to discuss them with your physician. What we CAN help with is education on what you can do to reduce your risk of being bitten by mosquitoes, in general.

The mosquitoes that carry the chikungunya virus (as well as other viruses) are the Yellow-Fever Mosquito (aedes aegypti) and the Asian Tiger Mosquito (aedes albopictus).

As of this writing, no infected mosquitoes have been found in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, or anywhere in the United States. So far the CDC is reporting that all of the documented cases of chikunguyna in the US have been in people who have recently traveled outside of the United States to a country with the infected mosquitoes.

Recommendations to reduce the mosquito population in Murfreesboro, middle Tennessee, and beyond:

To reduce your risk of being bitten by mosquitoes we have a long list of recommendations that we give to every customer on our Mosquito Management Program. Almost every item in our list involves getting rid of anything that holds standing water and/or making sure to empty and scrub items that hold water, frequently. Also, contact your City and/or County and make sure that they are treating water retention areas with a larvicide on a regular basis.

  • Dispose of old tires, tin cans, buckets, drums, bottles, plastic sheeting, or any water-holding containers.
  • Clean debris from rain gutters to allow proper drainage.
  • Fill in or drain low places (puddles, ruts, etc) in your yard.
  • Keep drains, ditches, and culverts clean of weeds and trash so water can flow properly.
  • Cover trash containers to keep out rain water
  • Check around outdoor faucets and air conditioner units and repair leaks or other causes for water puddles.
  • Empty plastic wading pools at least once per week and store indoors when not in use.
  • Make sure your backyard pool is cared for while away from the home.
  • Fill in tree holes and stumps that hold water with sand or cement.
  • Change the water in bird baths, plant pots, and drip trays at least once per week.
  • Keep the grass cut short and shrubbery well trimmed around the house where adult mosquitoes may rest.
  • Irrigate lawns and gardens carefully to prevent water from standing.
  • Eliminate seepage from cisterns, cesspools, and septic tanks.
  • Stock ornamental pools with top feeding predacious minnows.
  • Check window and door screens on the home. Be sure they are in good condition to seal out mosquitoes.
  • Wear light-colored clothing, plus long sleeve shirts and long pants for extra protection.
  • Use repellants on skin and clothing while outdoors.

In addition to these steps, The Bug Man also offers a Mosquito Reduction Program.

Termite Activity Found in Murfreesboro, TN

When is termite season in central TN

The Bug Man found termite activity in Murfreesboro and surrounding areas.

Termite season is in full swing here in Murfreesboro and surrounding areas.  Most of the calls we are fielding  this week are in regards to active termite swarms.  We have had calls from Mt. Juliet, Lebanon, Smyrna, Rockvale, and Murfreesboro.  The termites are swarming now that the weather is warming up, the humidity is high, and the sun is beginning to shine.  Termites swarm in order to establish a new colony.  When the termites swarm and leave the existing colony, they fly towards the sunlight in search of a mate.  If the termites swarm outside, they will drift in the wind, land, break off their wings, locate a mate, and return back into the soil to begin a new colony.  But, the termites that swarm inside will usually fly towards windows and other light sources.  They will all die if they are unable to find a mate and return to soil.  When this happens, most homeowners will usually find the swarmer termites and wings around the windows, doors, or lights.  This is an indication that an inspection and  treatment is needed.  Here is a photo of termite shelter tubes that our technician found in a crawl space at a house in Christiana that had an active termite swarm on Friday.

Swarming termites are not the biggest concern

The swarming termites are not the real problem in a home, it is the worker termites hidden inside the walls that concern us.  They are the ones that feed on the cellulose (wood) of your home and cause the damage.  The worker termites are responsible for building the tunnels, feeding the colony, and all of the general duties of the colony,  The workers are the termites that get the work done!  But the swarming termites are definitely a sign that you have a problem!  When you see the termite swarmers, it is time to call The Bug Man.  When our trained technicians arrive on site, they will inspect the home, note their findings, review the information with the property owner, answer any questions, and provide a solution for the termite infestation.  The Bug Man uses Termidor HE for all of our termite treatments.  Termidor has been proven as the best termite solution in the industry, and that is why The Bug Man has teamed up with the makers of  Termidor, BASF.

 

Tips for Mosquito Control This Summer

Tips for Mosquito Control This Summer

The Bug Man offers tips to help reduce the mosquito populations around your home.

There are a lot of different ways to approach mosquito control. You could dance if you want to. You could leave your friends behind.

A graduate student from the University of Florida Entomology program prefers the dance method. We found a video that features a ‘skeeter slap dance.’ Check it out below:

Not only is that video amusing, but it also offers a closer look at mosquitoes. Most of us slap them away too quickly to actually see what they look like.  Below we list steps you can take to help reduce the mosquito populations around your home.  While you may not achieve complete mosquito control, this will help.

Steps to help mosquito reduction and control.

  • As you saw in that video, the student was wearing long pants and a long-sleeve t-shirt. When you’re out and about with mosquitoes out, it helps if you wear clothing that covers up your arms and legs.
  • Emptying out areas of standing water is also really helpful for mosquito control. This includes kiddie pools, unused bird baths, tins in the yard, and even inside old tires.
  • Change the water in birdbaths, plant pots, and drip trays at least once a week.
  • Clean the debris out of your rain gutters to allow proper drainage.
  • Use a mosquito repellent with deet when you’re outside.
  • Check around outdoor faucets and air conditioning units and repair leaks or puddles.
  • Cover trash containers to keep out rain water.
The Bug Man also offers a seasonal mosquito reduction program. Please call our office at 615.217.7284 for more information on how we can reduce the mosquito population in your yard.