Overwintering Series: When do Mosquitoes stop biting?

“Baby, it’s cold outside. But I’ll take the chill in the air over the mosquitoes and bites on my arm any day!” – Anonymous resident of Middle Tennessee

mosquitoes

Much to the delight of many, the mosquitoes that once populated the air space have chilled out for the winter. These bugs typically stop biting humans in temperatures below 50° Fahrenheit.

To survive the winter or to endure a drought, mosquito eggs and certain types of larvae enter into diapause—a delay of development due to a change in environment where the pest goes into a state of dormancy. The dormant mosquitoes have enough molecules stored to make it through the winter.

Adult male mosquitoes die after the fall mating season. Female mosquitoes find a safe place to hide out for the winter. Then, when the weather warms up and the rains return, they seek out a blood meal from the local neighborhood human and then lay their eggs in standing water. If you’re the person collecting H₂0 with the eclectic mix of old tires, kiddie pools, and pie tins in your back yard, they’re coming for you.

We typically treat for mosquitoes between May and October. However, in 2012, we started our mosquito treatments early because of how hot it got in April. It’s not uncommon to treat for mosquitoes after October, either. If the weather became unseasonably warm in December, it’s possible to see mosquito activity.

As the weather goes, so do our mosquito treatments. Don’t hesitate to call us at 615.217.7284 if you’re seeing them in your area, even if it seems too early or too late in the season.